A Special Purim in Jerusalem



By Rabbi Levi Weiman-Kelman

Before we are overwhelmed by Passover preparations, I wanted to share a description of a unique Purim celebration here in Jerusalem. We have been struggling with increasing attempts of the Ultra-Orthodox to ban women from the public sphere (ha-adarat nashim in Hebrew).  Women members of Kol HaNeshama helped organize a women’s megillah reading in Zion square. The reading was held a day before the traditional reading of the megillah (in Jerusalem we read it a day after the rest of the Jewish world on Shushan Purim). About a hundred people attended (men were invited to come dressed as women).

The  women who read from the megillah included representatives of all the Jerusalem Reform congregations and the Israel Religious Action Center.  Most impressive were the young adults who read – despite the difficult surroundings. No doubt it made an impression on the hundreds of passers-by who cheered on the readers (for all it was a first for them to hear women chanting from the megillah). It might be considered setting the bar low – but the event was considered a success, especially since no one was arrested or attacked. We hope to make this an annual event.

Rabbi Levi Weiman-Kelman is the rabbi at Kol HaNeshama in Jerusalem. He is pictured above (on the right) with Rabbi Stanley Davids, immediate Past President of ARZA.

Print Friendly
Twitter Digg Delicious Stumbleupon Technorati Facebook Email
ARZA Guest Blogger

About ARZA Guest Blogger

Posts by ARZA Staff and leaders in the Reform Movement in the US and Israel.

4 Responses to “A Special Purim in Jerusalem”

  1. Men were asked as a symbolic act to dress as women for a Purim event highlighting the exclusion of women from public space in Jerusalem. Of course, some men chose not to dress up for the occasion – and were welcomed anyway.

  2. Larry Kaufman

    In his picture on the Temple Emanu-El website, Stanley is shown with gray hair. But now he can tell us if blondes have more fun.

  3. I’m puzzled by the idea of men being welcome only if they dressed as women. From a
    Reform perspective, that forced egalitarianism in attire seems anti-egalitarian; and from an Orthodox perspective, it flaunts an explicit taboo.

    Rationale? Result?

Leave a Reply

*