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Planning for 7 Billion: Water Scarcity



Two and a half years ago I celebrated Passover in China, attending Seder with Kehillat Beijing, a congregation composed mostly of Jewish expats living and studying in the Chinese capital. Gathered together to retell the exodus of our ancestors, I remember reaching the point in the story where Moses parts the Red Sea to lead […]

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Election Reform for the 21st Century



Proponents of voter ID laws argue that voters should be required to present government-issued ID at the polls in order to limit voter fraud. But a new report released this Tuesday helps expose one of the major flaws in this line of reasoning: poor design and out-of-date technology are more likely to cause problems in […]

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Election Year Dos and Don’ts



As one rabbi recently wrote on this blog, voting is a mitzvah. “A ruler is not to be appointed unless the community is first consulted,” we read in Talmud (B’rachot 55a). American Jews have a special opportunity and obligation to put these democratic values into practice on Election Day, this year falling on November 6. […]

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At the Starting Line: 14% by 2014



Two years from now, we will celebrate the beginning of the Shmittah year, or sabbatical year. Shmittah marks the seventh year in the ancient agricultural cycle, when we are commanded to “release” (the literal Hebraic translation of shmittah) the Earth from human stress. Our land is to lay fallow and any fruits or vegetables that […]

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In the Aftermath of the Colorado Firestorm



Yesterday, following weeks of fast-moving wildfires spreading across the state, Governor John Hickenlooper officially lifted the fire ban in Colorado.  Extreme fires have burned throughout Colorado since late June, devastating thousands of acres of land and causing tens of thousands of people to evacuate their homes. At its height, ten major fires were burning throughout […]

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Voting Rights: A Civil Rights Struggle Revived



Over the last year, many Americans have spoke against the voter suppression laws that have swept the nation, state by state. But there are few who can speak with more passion or heart than those who actively organized, rallied and marched during the Civil Rights Movement to fight for expanded rights, including voting rights, for […]

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Two Years After the Spill: Much Accomplished, Much to Do



April 20, 2010, began as an ordinary day for residents of the Gulf Coast. Fishermen woke up early to head out for the daily catch, and news outlets reported on the perils of the U.S. economy. Outside, the skies were overcast with temperatures in the high 60s, standard conditions before summer’s suffocating humidity settled in. […]

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Webinar Recap: Get Out & Garden Today



The weather was perfect yesterday in Washington, D.C.: sunny skies, a warm breeze, and budding tulips and cherry blossoms everywhere you go.  Nature is slowly emerging from the darkness of winter.  I can’t help but think about how Passover, celebrating the Jewish people’s exodus from Egypt and the shackles of slavery thousands of years ago, […]

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Get Out the Vote 2012: Why Jews Must Vote



This post is part our weekly Get Out the Vote 2012 series, focusing on ways to promote civic engagement in your Jewish community and highlighting portions from the RAC’s Get Out the Vote 2012 guide. Check back every Monday for new updates. As heirs to a tradition of civic engagement, Americans Jews must participate in […]

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Colbert Bid Sheds Light on Citizens United Flaws



Last Thursday, Stephen Colbert shook up the 2012 Presidential primary season by announcing that he was forming an exploratory committee to consider entering the Republican race for “President of the United States of South Carolina.” But there was one hitch: Colbert was also serving as head of his Super PAC, “Americans for a Better Tomorrow, […]

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EPA Cross-State Air Pollution Rule Delayed in Court



Earlier this month, a federal appeals court issued an order to delay the implementation of the EPA’s finalized Cross-State Air Pollution Rule.  Originally slated to go into effect in 27 Eastern states on January 1, 2012, the rule would impose stricter standards for power plants producing pollution that crosses state lines. The Cross-State Air Pollution […]

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MT Supreme Court Ruling Challenges Citizens United



With the presidential primary season now in full swing, campaign finance issues are at the forefront of the political debate. Super PAC spending in the Republican primary has been on the rise, with endorsements and attack ads flooding the airwaves in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina (which holds the next primary election). On the […]

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NCJW Hosts Voter ID Call



In the last year, new restrictive election laws have been considered by more than 34 state legislatures across America. Particularly alarming are voter ID laws that have been passed in more than a dozen states, restricting voter access and eligibility for upcoming elections. Supporters say the new restrictions will limit occurrences of voter fraud; in […]

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Eye on Campaign Spending in Iowa



Yesterday’s Iowa caucuses marked the start of the 2012 primaries and showed that the campaign finance waters are muddy in this election season – and are expected to only grow murkier in the coming months as campaigns fan out across the country. This is the first presidential election since the 2010 Supreme Court decision Citizens […]

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