Posts Tagged: *Rosh HaShanah
10 Years of Ten Minutes of Torah

The Gates are Closing, and God’s Hand is Outstretched



By Rabbi Edwin Goldberg The N’ilah service on late Yom Kippur afternoon is notable for its image of the Gates of Repentance closing their doors.  At this late and hungry hour, for the final time during the Day of Atonement, we are summoned to repentance.  The fact that many Sages argue we can actually delay […]

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10 Years of Ten Minutes of Torah

Mincha for the New Machzor: Good Habits Replacing Bad Habits



By Edwin Goldberg The afternoon service – a tradition not usually observed in Reform Judaism – is an important part of Yom Kippur observance for Reform Jews. Not only does it help fill the time between the morning and break-the-fast; it also offers yet another opportunity for reflection and repentance. The editors of the upcoming machzor, […]

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It’s Never Too Late To Engage Our Teens



The Journal of Youth Engagement is an online forum of ideas and dialogue for those committed to engaging youth in vibrant Jewish life and living. Join the discussion and become a contributor. by Ellie Laycook During Rosh HaShanah this year, one of “my” teens was invited to give the High Holy Day appeal during services.  The […]

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Sounds of Penitence: The Music of Selichot



By Cantor Hayley Kobilinsky It may seem strange, but I wish to begin with a very Jewish, and yet not at all Jewish phrase: “Bless me, Father, for I have sinned.” These words are what a Catholic person says upon entering Confession, or at least that is how we all see it portrayed in television […]

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Selichot and Reform Judaism: “I’m Gonna Wait to the Midnight Hour”



By Rabbi Edwin Goldberg When I was growing up at a large Reform temple in Kansas City, a sign of my relative maturity was being allowed to attend the yearly Selichot service.  This service was held usually on the Saturday night before Rosh HaShanah and ended right at midnight.  This meant I got to stay up […]

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Selichot: Poems that Ask for Forgiveness



by Dr. Richard Sarason When most North American Reform Jews hear the word “selichot,” they likely think of the late Saturday night service with this name that precedes Rosh Hashanah by roughly a week and introduces the penitential season. But why is this service called Selichot? Because its liturgy is comprised primarily of a genre of […]

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Vidui: Atonement through A-tune-ment



By Cantor Daniel Singer Thanks to the creative team at G-dcast, when we arrive at the Vidui section of the High Holidaymachzor, we can truly say “there’s an app for that!” The world now has access to atonement by way of a web application called eScapegoat. That’s right – just confess your sins anonymously online to an animated goat […]

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A Sin By Any Other Name



By Rabbi Leon Morris Folks out there – colleagues and laypeople alike – feel quite strongly about the use of the word “sin” in the new machzor. Or so it seems from the feedback we’ve heard in the piloting process. But these strong feelings about the word “sin” fall into two opposite camps. There are those who […]

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Viddui: The Public Confession of Sins on Yom Kippur



By Rabbi Richard Sarason The most central liturgy of Yom Kippur is also perhaps, for moderns, the most problematic. How do we understand the words “sin” and atonement” that lie at the heart of the act of viddui, the public confession of sins that immediately follows the Amidah during each of the Yom Kippur services? Perhaps some historical […]

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Repetition vs Addition: Melody of M’chal in the Yom Kippur Amidah



By Cantor Hayley Kobilinsky There may be no better day than Yom Kippur to observe the emphasis achieved by repetition of prayer. Our siddur provides many opportunities throughout the year to highlight unique aspects of the day by adding prayers or changing melodies, such as singing the V’shamru on Shabbat or using a special melody to light the Chanukkiah. The majority […]

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Yom Kippur Amidah



By Rabbi Edwin Goldberg In each Amidah for the Days of Awe, including Yom Kippur, there is an insertion regarding remembering us unto life.  This imagery of the Book of Life is an important reminder that the Days of Awe are designed to help us deal with both the uncertainty of life and our responsibility to […]

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The Yom Kippur Amidah



By Rabbi Richard Sarason The Yom Kippur Amidah is an extended variant of that for Rosh Hashanah, which was discussed in the Ten Minutes of Torah posting of February 28, 2013, and may usefully be consulted in this context. All of the insertions that are made into the Amidah on Rosh Hashanah and Shabbat Shuvah (the Sabbath of Repentance […]

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The Timeless Melody Kol Nidrei



By Hayley Kobilinsky How many Jewish holidays (or, for that matter, any religion’s holidays) can you name which are referred to by one prayer? Not many, I can assure you. Even though Kol Nidre is only once segment of the evening service, which is only the beginning of the Yom Kippur observance, we don’t call the […]

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Kol Nidrei



By Rabbi Edwin Goldberg In Woody Allen’s Annie Hall, at the beginning of their first date, Woody asks Annie for a first kiss.  As he explains it, he knows both of them will be thinking about it all through the night so wouldn’t it be better to get it out of the way and then […]

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