Posts Tagged: *Yom HaShoah

Remembering Rwanda on Yom Hashoah



On Yom Hashoah we remember the great tragedy that we as a people and as a world faced during World War II over 60 years ago. But how do we use that memory today? To what end does that experience motivate our community? Surely one answer is that we as a people must be particularly […]

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A Sense of Community



Today is Yom Hashoah, the remembrance day for the Holocaust. This day is a very emotional and heart wrenching time for Israelis, as many have family members who were in the Holocaust or are survivors.

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Mel Gibson’s Latest Remark about Jews Makes Me Want to Teach My Son Well



by Linda K. Wertheimer “You Jewish son of a b….,” a boy taunted my brother on the school bus one day as I sat nearby. I was 14, my brother, Kevin, 16. The comment made us seethe, but we let it pass. Then a few weeks later, my family, the only Jewish one in our […]

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Yom HaShoah Across the Web



Today is Yom HaShoah, or Holocaust Remembrance Day, when we pay tribute to all those who died in the Holocaust. Shoah, which means “catastrophe” or “utter destruction” in Hebrew, refers to the atrocities that were committed against the Jewish people during World War II. We’ve posted a number of moving and meaningful blog posts on […]

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Never Again Bystanders



A couple of years ago, at the ripe old age of 96, Simon Wiesenthal died in his sleep. Wiesenthal survived nine different concentration and labor camps and faced certain death on two occasions, but somehow, he outlived his Nazi tormentors. Following the war, Wiesenthal appointed himself advocate of the tortured, the starved, the degraded and […]

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Speak Up to Say “Never Again”



To this day, I still cannot comprehend how one person and some of his fellow countrymen could have carried out acts that decimated not only the Jewish communities of Europe, but also targeted any group of people they deemed unworthy. The countless men, women and children who were systematically murdered for their religious beliefs, cultural […]

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“What Must Be Said”: Günter Grass, My Book & Me



by Erika Dreifus In 2006, Günter Grass’s confession that he’d been a member of the Waffen SS surprised me. But it didn’t depress me. It didn’t anger me. Grass seemed appropriately ashamed and regretful. I knew him to be an advocate for Germany’s recognition of its Nazi past. He wasn’t asking for my forgiveness, but […]

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One Name



by Leah Wolff-Pellingra This is the story of one life. Her name was Mina Speier-Holstein. She was one of 15 children born in Cologne. She taught Home Economics and Physical Education. She had one son. On Kristallnacht, they found each other – Mina, her husband, Baruch, and her son, Jonas. They roamed the parks all […]

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Yom HaShoah: A Musical Reflection



by Vicky Glikin Music plays a critical role in society as an integral part of social and political history, but more importantly as intrinsic to the total human experience, noted Irene Heskes, a historian and author specializing in sacred and secular Jewish music. This observation is especially apt when considering the music of the Holocaust, […]

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Yom HaShoah: The World We are Given



by Rabbi Jeff Goldwasser A few weeks ago, I had this conversation with my 13-year-old daughter who was reading Elie Wiesel’s Night for a school assignment. I was driving her home with her in the back seat. I said, “You know, it’s not a subject I like to talk about.” And she said, “I know.” […]

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Dan Pagis – Written in Pencil in the Sealed Boxcar: Timeless Hebrew Poetry of the Shoah



by Dan Utley As Yom HaShoah approaches we find ourselves yet another year farther removed from the horrors of the last century.  As our survivors continue to depart from this world we struggle to find new ways to remember what we have not seen with our own eyes and teach new generations to have the […]

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Wolf Manheimer

Reflection on Yom Hashoah



by Aron Hirt-Manheimer Jews throughout the world have been commemorating the Holocaust annually on the 27th of Nisan since 1953, when the Israeli government inaugurated this day of remembrance and linked to the heroic Warsaw Ghetto Uprising  of a decade earlier. The message was clear: even suicidal armed resistance is preferable to going like lambs […]

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The Evolving Narrative of the Holocaust Memory in Israel



By Roey Schiff Holocaust Remembrance Day, which comes upon us soon, is a time to reflect on the darkest tragedy of the Jewish people in the modern age (and some would say in all of history). The importance of having such a day is indisputable, but personally, I must say I find myself pondering the […]

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Galilee Diary: Non-collective memory



Remember what Amalek did to you on your journey, after you left Egypt…you shall blot out the memory of Amalek from under heaven. Do not forget! -Deuteronomy 25:17, 19 In recent decades, trips to Poland for 11th graders have become de rigueur in high schools in middle class communities. These generally take place just before […]

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