Bobby Harris and Sophie in Selma

Reflections from a Father-Daughter Trip to Selma



By Bobby and Sophie Harris

My daughter Sophie and I drove from our home in Marietta, GA to participate in the commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of Bloody Sunday in Selma, Alabama. We attended a pre-march program at Temple Mishkan Israel—Selma’s only synagogue. Though the synagogue has less than 10 remaining members, the sanctuary was full that morning. Sophie was one of just a handful of youth who attended the service. Below are our reflections from the day: Read more…

Keep Abortion Legal

Pursuing Choice in the States: The Current State(s) of Reproductive Rights



It seems like every day—if not several times a day—that I get an email update from one of our coalition partners or from one of my reproductive rights news alerts telling me that another state anti-choice bill has moved forward. Just this week, Ohio state legislators introduced a bill to ban abortion after 20 weeks, one of several of its kind across the country; the Montana House of Representatives and an Idaho Senate committee passed a ban on abortion telemedicine, with dangerous implications for rural women who live too far from an abortion provider to consult a physician in person; and a Florida House committee advanced mandatory waiting period legislation, which would require patients to consult a physician at least 24 hours before having an abortion.

It can certainly be difficult to keep track of the frenzy of anti-choice legislation, especially as reproductive health victories these days are few and far between. (In a single, yet important victory among the slew of advances, a New Mexico Senate committee halted bills to increase abortion restrictions after the first trimester and to ban altogether abortions after 20 weeks.) What is most important to remember, however, is that each of these laws has real consequences for women and families living in that state. Read more…

Spanish Haggadah

Set Your Passover Seder Table with Inclusion and Acceptance



One of my favorite things about Reform Judaism is how much the Reform Movement accepts multicultural families and celebrates diversity. The Reform Movement has always stood for inclusion and acceptance of all types and ways of being Jewish, and our wholehearted embrace of interfaith families is a demonstration of our commitment to pluralism even within Reform Judaism. Read more…

Parashat Vayikra: Witnessing Climate Change



We are all watching climate change happen. Wherever you live, you are experiencing some of the effects of climate disruption. If you’re living in a coastal area, you know that sea levels are rising and your community is more vulnerable to floods than ever before. If you live in the Midwest or California or Israel, you would know that droughts are becoming longer and more severe. And no matter where your community calls home, you are most likely keenly aware of the increased frequency and intensity of hurricanes, storms, typhoons, and other extreme weather events. In these ways alone, you are a witness to our changing climate. Read more…

Israeli Elections

Recapping the Israeli Elections



Israelis went to the polls to elect a new Knesset for the 20th time in its history on Tuesday, in what was supposed to be one of the closest elections in years. When voting ended at 10 p.m., exit polling predictions showed Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s party, Likud, in a dead heat with the center-left Zionist Union opposition party. When Israelis woke up Wednesday and the votes had been counted, it became clear that Netanyahu’s Likud had won a decisive victory, with 30 seats in Knesset compared to Zionist Union’s 24. Isaac Herzog, the leader of Zionist Union, who had been hoping to become Prime Minister and form the next Israeli government, called Netanyahu earlier Wednesday to concede the election. Read more…

Putting the Jew in Sustainable Food Justice



By Becky Wasserman

Sustainable food is trendy. More and more, people gloat about the heritage, organic, local tomatoes they bought from the farmer’s market and scoff at the McDonald’s burger. While it’s great that more people are starting to consider the human and environmental impacts of their consumption habits, an even bigger hurdle awaits in finding ways to make this food accessible to everyone. The good news is that Jewish communities are on the forefront of the fight for sustainable food justice. Read more…

Budget documents

The Budget as a Moral Document



As Congress and the administration consider different approaches to allocating the funding to run our government, we are here to discuss the budget negotiations on our country’s most vulnerable populations. We believe that the federal budget is a moral document. We want to support vital domestic programs that respond to the needs of people in need.  

In Deuteronomy, one of the five books of Moses, we are taught “If… there is a needy person among you… do not harden your heart and shut your hand against your kin.  Rather, you must open your hand and lend whatever is sufficient.  “Let us pray that our budget will keep maintain these ideals.

As people of faith, we advocate for a just and compassionate federal budget that will promote the dignity of all Americans and will protect the vulnerable.

Yet let us also be called to act: given this knowledge given to us during this webinar and our passions, let us “speak up, judge righteously, champion the poor and the needy.” Let us advocate for a budget that will do just that.

We pray for a budget that well help all Americans and ensure a bright future for the country.

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When the Teacher Becomes the Student: How the Teens at L’Taken Inspire My Social Justice Work



I’ve loved working at the RAC these past six months and one of the highlights of my time at the RAC so far has been our L’Taken social justice seminars for high school students, where nearly 300 Reform Jewish teens come to Washington, D.C. for a weekend to learn about social justice, lobby on Capitol Hill and get inspiration to be lifelong Jewish advocates. Now, when I first applied for this job, I wasn’t particularly excited about L’Taken. While the idea of engaging high school students on important social justice issues sounded appealing, I thought back to how my classmates behaved in high school. Fortunately, it turned out I was wrong and running six L’Takens the past three months has reminded me why I love working for the RAC so much.

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